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Homemade Beef Bone Broth

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Homemade Beef Bone Broth

by Maria Luci, editor at Maria’s Farm Country Kitchen and Rodale’s

Drinking bone broth is more than just the latest food trend—it’s an easy and delicious way to add a little extra nutrition to your daily diet. Linked to a number of health and beauty benefits, homemade bone broth (a longer-simmered version of soup stock) is brimming with nutrients like calcium, magnesium, and phosphorus. It’s also a great source of collagen, a protein that when consumed is good for your gut while also helping to promote healthy joints, arteries, and wrinkle-free skin.

Fortunately, making your own beneficial bone broth is simple and requires little prep work. Many times, you can gather leftover bones from meals (especially if you’re making a turkey or roasted chicken version of this broth). But if you don’t have any leftover bones, most butchers or grocery store meat counters can supply the necessary marrow and bones needed to create an effective broth.

Just remember, the healthiest, best-tasting version of bone broth is always made with organic ingredients!

Beef Bone Broth

Ingredients:

  • 2 pounds beef bones with marrow
  • 2 pounds beef short rib bones with a little meat on them
  • 3 medium carrots, cut into chunks
  • 1 medium onion, chopped
  • 2 celery stalks, chopped
  • 1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar
  • Salt and pepper, to taste
  • Fresh herbs or spices, such as parsley, sage, or thyme (optional)

Directions:

1. In a large pot, sauté the carrots, onion, and celery on the stovetop until they become slightly translucent.

2. Add the bones and apple cider vinegar to the pot and cover with water. (The vinegar will help pull healthy minerals from the bones.)

3. Bring to a boil and then reduce to a simmer. Simmer for at least 8 hours, and up to 48.

4. Feel free to add salt and pepper, as well as herbs and spices, at the end of cooking.

5. Let the broth cool before straining with a fine-mesh strainer or sieve. Discard the bones and vegetables. Enjoy as is, use as a soup stock, or store for future use in the refrigerator or freezer.

marialuciMaria Luci is the manager and editor at Maria’s Farm Country Kitchen and content creator and editor at Rodale’s. She grew up in Virginia, but now lives in Philly with her husband, a black cat, and a giant Aloe plant named Big Al. When not writing and editing, she’s usually cooking up organic recipes or running—or eating when she should be running.

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